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Eva Stettner

The poignancy of Eva Stettner's sculpture is evident in even the simplest gestures such as the uplifted hand of her life-sized piece, "Margaret." That single gesture embodies the rugged vulnerability of the women this artist chooses to portray. Stettner notes that her mission is to capture the natural character of the models she selects. The models are complicated and intense, revealing much about themselves through their expressive postures. Their inherent elegance is captured in a flash of beauty by this artist.

The surface of these works is less like real skin than a pastiche of luminescent paint, at once a revealing and protective covering. Stettner layers the glazes and underglazes and then puts the pieces into a raku firing where the outcome is always something of an unknown. She sometimes paints the piece again after it has been fired to enhance its textural quality.

Stettner's technique is to make a life cast of the model which is then used to create the clay figure. Her life-like figures are deliberately disjointed in the way they come together to point up the vulnerability of the subject. The artist gives the viewer a beautiful but imperfect sculpture to admire, unlike the goddesses traditionally offered for adulation. Working in the same figurative vein as Duane Hanson and George Segal, Stettner eschews the remote and impersonal presentation of the other artists in favor of a compelling gaze and surface that confronts and draws the viewer near.

Ms. Stettner's sculptures are found in private collections internationally.


Eva Stettner

[Picture]
Nadine
Clay, Glaze Raku-Fired
68" x 37" x 22"
$

[Picture]
Laurie II
Low-fire Clay
67" x 32" x 25"
$

[Picture]
Margaret
Low-fire Clay
47" x 31" x 41"
$




[Picture]

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